Griffon Basketball Adjusting to NCAA Rule Changes

Griffon Basketball Adjusting to NCAA Rule Changes

Missouri Western's head coaches sound off on new rules cracking down on hand checking and charge-block calls.
(ST. JOSEPH) "Bring a pregame meal, postgame meal, mid-game meal, sleeping bag, pillows... you're going to need it."

That's how Missouri Western head women's basketball coach Rob Edmisson describes what fans can expect this season: games made longer by the NCAA's new rules.

The changes, which went into affect at the start of the season, crack down on hand checking and what is a charge-block call. It's already begun to affect the length and style of games.

"Basically, out on the floor, you can't put your hand on someone," first-year head men's basketball coach Brett Weiberg said. "If you put your hand on someone, it puts you in jeopardy of being called for a foul. You put an armbar on a post player once they've caught the ball, then you're in jeopardy of being called for a foul."

Through the Griffon women's first exhibition game and regular season opener, There have been 87 fouls called and 81 free throws attempts. It's even worse for the men through three games: 120 fouls and159 shots from the charity stripe.

Part of this could be early growing pains, but coaches say get used to the officiating.

"It's a mandate. They're supposed to call it. If they do not call it, meaning the officials, then they're job could be in jeopardy."

The change comes in an effort to ramp up the scoring in the college game after the 2012-2013 season saw the lowest scoring average in 31 years. Now, it's up to all team's at all levels to adjust to make that happen, or everyone is in for a long year.

"We've designed in our recruiting, in the first year-and-a-half that I've been here, a certain type of kid that guards a certain way," Edmisson said. "We like to get out and defend, get into you, press you, press full-court, play handsy, and you can't do that."

"I think sometimes fans aren't going to be really happy with the stoppage of play," Weiberg added. "Especially at the higher levels when you come to see the so-called stars and the stars aren't on the floor because of foul trouble, that'll be interesting to see how the fans react to that."

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