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139th Airlift Wing Welcomes Financial Leaders to Training Center

On the advent of a new intelligence course for foreign airmen, the 139th Airlift Wing welcomes some special guests to see what their training center is all about.
(ST. JOSEPH, Mo.) Colonel Ed Black talks very passionately about what he likes about his work place.

He's the commander at the Advanced Airlift Tactics Training Center, the school within the 139th Airlift Wing in St. Joseph.

He speaks to financial leaders within the military, leaders who fund the AATTC; it's a gathering they're calling the Allied Open House.

"If they don't buy into what we're doing, we're not going to get money for our services and quit international training," Col. Black said.  "So this is really an education piece, an outreach piece, building partnerships and relationships with organizations that help fund our activities."

For some of them, it's the first time they've visited the facility.

Major Jeff Ryan Montgomery shares his colleague's passion.

Major Montgomery teaches a brand new course, which covers intelligence concepts for foreign allies.

"To my knowledge there's never been a course like this, that mixes allied intel (sic) professionals, other ally nations, other air crews, as well as US forces in a scenario like we're doing here.  This is an absolutely unique course," Colonel Black said.

The leader of the new course says he expects this inaugural course to continue to evolve.

"There could be holes being shot into our aircraft and that has to take priority over everything.  We get the aircraft back home and more importantly the people back home.  That's where we're starting right now," Maj. Montgomery said.  "If I see anything as part of an evolution I would forecast more of an exchange on training techniques: how do you train?  How do you learn?  What have you seen?"

The AATTC is no stranger to a foreign audience.

Its symposium regularly attracts airmen from other countries, and even the lobby of the building sports flags of our nation's foreign allies that have been to the AATTC for training.

Major Montgomery says coalitions have been vital for decades.

"I worked with the Japanese and the South Koreans in Kuwait," he said.  "And I told them what I'll tell you now.  If you're going to put your lives on the line with us, in a humanitarian operation or a combat operation, I owe it to you to get you home to your families as much as the US guys."

Right now the course has three students.  They are from Belgium, Denmark, and Germany.
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