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Gov. Calls on Colleges to Freeze Tuition

Governor Jay Nixon calls for a tuition freeze at public colleges
(MARYVILLE, Mo.) Governor Jay Nixon met with the Board of Regents at Northwest Missouri State University Thursday to applaud them for freezing tuition.

The university is one of several in the state that voted not to increase the cost of higher education.

"I'm very impressed and I'm thankful that the board went along with my call to free tuition this year," said Nixon.

Students say they're happy tuition won't increase next year. They say it's one less added expense they'll need to prepare for.

"It's great because it's going to be my senior year so not having to pay that extra amount for those last few classes is going to be a great thing," said Keiauna Clay, a senior at NWMSU.

"Anything that allows them to not have to pay as much but still get that college education they want is huge," said Cody Uhing, Senate President and student at NWMSU.

"The thing we need to do right now from the state perspective is continue to invest more in these institutions and not call on the students to make-up those differences," added Nixon.

Governor Nixon says he's keeping his commitment to keep college affordable through his "good schools, good jobs" program.
Nixon's wants to focus more on science, technology, engineering and math, or stem.
Stem will provide an additional $22 million for public universities to expand science labs and produce more graduates.

"Education, especially in grade school, high school, and also in college has to be a broad curriculum," added Nixon. 

Currently, Missouri has the lowest tuition rate in the nation.

The college Board's 2013 Trends in College Pricing Report shows that tuition and fees at Missouri's public four-year institutions increased just 5 percent since 2008, lower than in any other state in the nation.

Nixon plans to keep it that way and hopes other states follow suit.

Since the Gov. Nixon took office, 279 schools have been added to Missouri's A+ Schools program.

As a result, over 99 percent of public high school students in Missouri now have the opportunity to earn an A+ scholarship and attend two years of community college tuition free.


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