56°F
Sponsored by

Kids are King at Royal Kids Camp

For 22 years, Royal Family Kids Camp has been helping abused, neglected, and under privileged children.
(STEWARTSVILLE, Mo.) From ages 7 to 11, kids have a place to go to for a week where they don't have to worry about anything, just the loving family around them.

There are more than 200 Royal Family Kids Camps, four of them being in Missouri.  And in Stewartsville, the camp at Farwesta has the same mission as the others which is to give kids a loving environment.

"For these children it's an opportunity to just be a child and play.  They don't have to worry about where their next meal is coming from, they don't have to worry about what they're going to wear the next day.  They just have a wide choice of activities and opportunities for themselves for a change," said Camp Director Sandy Hamlin.

All of the adults at the camp are volunteers, and they have special titles as well.

"This camp is set up like a family.  We have grandma and grandpa, aunts, uncles, cousins.  And our counselors, we don't call them counselors, we call them special friends because every family has special friends of the family," said Hamlin.

The Rotary Club served meals to everyone and even surprised all of the kids with a new pair of sneakers on Wednesday.

"A couple of members of the club just kind of took it to their heart, said we need to do this," said Assistant Director Ken Hamlin.

Six years ago, a Rotary Club member volunteered as a special friend which strengthened an already lasting partnership.

"She knew essentially what was going on, everybody liked her.  So it was an easy transition to get more people involved," said Ken Hamlin.

Aside from the meal, the shoes, and other donations.  Kids were simply just happy to be at camp.

"You're taking kids that are in a situation that your own children could luckily could not have been in and you're providing them a somewhat normal week.  They're allowed to, pretty much under control, do whatever they want," said Ken Hamlin.

Even though the camp caps at age 11, Ken Hamlin hopes that no matter the amount of time spent at the camp, it's enough to give kids a positive outlook on life.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

Local News