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Police Chiefs Write Letters for Red Light Camera Solution

After a November court ruling suspended red light cameras in the state, police chiefs are looking for answers from the Missouri Supreme Court.
(ST. JOSEPH, Mo.) Police chiefs in Kansas City and St. Louis partnered together to write a public letter asking for clarification from the Missouri Supreme Court in regards to red light cameras in the state.

A November court ruling suspended their enforcement after some backlash from drivers.

"When we went into this there were established rulings. Since then the rulings have been reversed," St. Joseph Police Chief Chris Connally said.

Connally supports the letter because of the state's inconsistencies with the rulings.

In the letter, the leaders discuss the effectiveness of the cameras and want clarification after lower courts have had different rulings. Departments are in a state of limbo while the Supreme Court decides if they will hear the case.

Connally said the cameras have done a good job in combating traffic problems in the city.

"Here in St. Joseph, we have seen the impact," he said. "We've seen change in driver habits caused by the photo enforcement and we've also seen the increase in red light running since that has ceased."

Red light cameras still sit at the intersection of the Belt Highway and Cook Road as well as the intersection of Belt and Frederick, but are turned off.

"The best thing for us, is for the Supreme Court to come out with a very defined ruling that would provide us the guidance we need," Connally said.

Steve Glorioso is a Kansas City based representative for American Traffic Solutions, the company that provides the cameras. He is also waiting to see what the court will decide.

"We hope the Supreme Court will take up the court from the lower courts and that they will rule in favor of the cities," Glorioso said.

Glorioso said the Supreme Court may make a decision as soon as next week on whether they will hear the case. If they decide not to, the future of red light cameras could be bleak. St. Louis has a temporary stay by a local court to continue enforcing the cameras while the courts decide.

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