Farmers Join Ag Experts for Field Day in Rock Port

Farmers Join Ag Experts for Field Day in Rock Port

More than 150 people took advantage of the free soil-health analysis near Rock Port. Results from the tests will aid in a statewide study on soil health and drought mitigation.
(ROCK PORT, Mo.) Tractors pulled loads of farmers instead of crops Tuesday at the Graves-Chapple Research Center.

More than 150 people took advantage of the free soil-health analysis near Rock Port. Results from the tests will aid in a statewide study on soil health and drought mitigation.

"This is a great opportunity for us to demonstrate and show research that benefits the growers of northwest Missouri, Kansas, southern Iowa, and eastern Nebraska. We have many people come into this area and theres different ways to manage corns and different ways to manage beans our main soy crops in northwest Missouri," said Agronomy Specialist, Wayne Flanary.

This summer has been a challenge for farmers with the swings in temperatures and precipitation.

"Growers need to be prepared from a risk management point of view, that anytime we can have, go from a drought to too much water and so as we think about our cropping systems we need to manage our cost and watch how we manage our risk as we put in those crops," said Flanary.

Despite August ending with temperatures in the mid-90s, temperatures were below normal throughout the months of April to August.

But, Steve Klute, with the University of Missouri Extension, says farmers are not in trouble.

"Actually the cool weather has helped a bit. Since we haven't had the rain, we haven't had the heat that went with it. But now the heats coming, so it's really going to speed up the corn's development," said Klute.

And farmers will take this summer over the past couple.

"Last year was a definite, a very dry summer, so we have good crops this year, so we're very fortunate in that situation. The year before then we had the flood in the Missouri River bottom and so that was a challenge, so you can see just here we have a flood one year and then it moves to the drought the next year," said Flanary.

The project will examine corn, soybeans and wheat statewide, then provide tips on how farmers can improve the quality of their land. The final results for the soil analysis will be posted in the next annual report.  
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